Our Leadership Team

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Talina Wood, Executive Director

Talina Wood was fourteen years old in 1993 when she joined the original Bainbridge Island Girl’s Talking Circle focus group, which met each week after school for 2 1/2 hours for 2 years. The circle, which lasted two years, provided the material for the book Daughters of the Moon, Sisters of the Sun: Young Women and Mentors on the Transition to Womanhood, which sold over 50,000 copies. Talina’s story is one of the first in the book.

Over the past twenty years, Talina has participated with TTC as President of our board of directors, managing director, circle participant, ambassador, and speaker.

From 2011 -2019, she was pivotal in the management and development of Eleven Winery, directing and training staff, and founding a special events program.

Talina is an avid hiker, naturalist, art appreciator, musician, and an all around badass! In addition, she is on the board of directors of Bike Works, a non-profit which promotes the bicycle as a vehicle for change to empower youth and build resilient communities.

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Heather Wolf, Program Director & Lead Ambassador

Heather Wolf and her sister, Genevieve, were the inspirations behind her mother’s, Linda Wolf, impetus to write Daughters of the Moon, Sisters of the Sun. Heather has been a participant in Girl’s Talking Circles and GenderTalks since she was twelve years old and continued through high school. In college and beyond, she has called and facilitated women’s circles. Heather is co-lead trainer for the Train the Trainer Cohort series with TTC. She currently co-facilitates the Seattle Girl’s Talking Circle, which is in it’s 5th year.

Heather has taken on nearly every role in TTC, including interim executive director and member of the board. Heather is our lead facilitator, lead ambassador, and lead speaker. Additionally, she offers workshops world-wide on wholistic health, fermentation, women’s sacred circle, and women’s moon circles.

Among her many talents, Heather is a professional Brewess, herbalist, musician, and recording artist with her group Wild Revival. She co-founded Iggy’s Alive and Cultured, and created and crafted the recipes for Iggy’s honey brew Kombucha.

 
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Linda Wolf, Founding Director & Lead Trainer

Linda Wolf co-founded the Daughters Sisters Project in 1993, which grew into Teen Talking Circles Project in 2001. Currently, Linda leads the Train the Trainer Program, and co-leads TTC Facilitator Trainings.

Linda Wolf and Neva Welton co-authored Speaking and Listening from the Heart, the TTC Facilitator’s Handbook. Linda speaks on behalf of the organization, and is board members emeritus.

In addition, Linda Wolf is a photographer with over 50 years artistry moving seamlessly through photojournalism, fine art, street, and portrait. She is also one of the first women rock & roll photographers. Her book, Tribute: Cocker Power, will be released in 2020, published by Insight Editions and distributed by Simon and Shuster. Her artwork is collected numerous institutions, libraries and museums worldwide.

Her website is lindawolf.net.

Board of Directors

Sarah Keenan, President: Life Artistry Coaching
Linda Wolf, VP
Eric Kuhner, Treasurer
Nora Harrington, Secretary

Advisory Board:

Jean Kilbourne, Producer, Speaker: Killing Us Softly
Riane Eisler, Educator, Author: Chalice and the Blade
Jonathan Frieman, Attorney, Co-Founder, JoMiJo Foundation, political activist
Elizabeth and Gifford Pinchot II, Founders: Bainbridge Graduate Institute
Muyta Macatumpag, Artist, Creative Empowerment Director: PYE Global; IndigenEYEZ;
Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr.: Founder, White Privilege Conference
Carol Gilligan: Author, In a Different Voice
Lindsay Wagner: Actress, Educator, Founder: Quiet the Mind and Open the Heart
Elise Carlson-Rainer, Ph.D.: Sexual Minority Rights as Human Rights, Henry M. Jackson School of Int. Studies

 
Culver Girls Academy 2018

Culver Girls Academy 2018

A Safe Space to Tell the Truth

Teen Talking Circles is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Since 1993, TTC has pioneered the talking circle movement for teens. In 2020, we celebrate our 27th year offering circles, trainings, retreats, workshops, and books both for youth and adults. We are humbled and in awe of the value of circle every time a participant tells us, “circle saved my life.”

Our vision is to seed Teen Talking Circles in diverse communities world wide by training adults to lead them. In this vein, we partner with many youth serving organization, schools, after-school programs. Each year, our TTC Facilitator Trainings support new facilitators to start and run circles in their communities. Our three books combined have sold over 70,000 copies and have been translated into Chinese and Turkish. Our special projects, such as the Full Woman Video Project ( Click Here ) have reached thousands of people around the world.

Teen circles can happen wherever you want to meet up and sit in circle. They can take place on a nature hike, in a school room, in a church or temple — anywhere you can create a private space and carve out time. Each year, the Seattle Girls Circle holds a summer sleepover in a little cabin in the woods. We set up a central table full of meaningful objects: candles, shells, bones, precious stones, feathers, bowls of water and Earth, and Tibetan singing bowls. These “things” honor and symbolize that we’re establishing a sacred space and time — setting a symbolic boundary to distinguish that this will not be a place for the “normal” way we interact with each other, the normal conversations. Instead we are establishing that this will be a time for a deeper form of listening and sharing of our real selves, vulnerable selves, the selves in us that need to be seen and heard in order to grow and become even more our true selves in the world. In this safe space, we can talk about the hard issues — all the isms we experience as individuals in this world and grow our capacities for compassion for each other and ourselves. We deeply inform each other.

Teen circles can happen wherever you want to meet up and sit in circle. They can take place on a nature hike, in a school room, in a church or temple — anywhere you can create a private space and carve out time. Each year, the Seattle Girls Circle holds a summer sleepover in a little cabin in the woods. We set up a central table full of meaningful objects: candles, shells, bones, precious stones, feathers, bowls of water and Earth, and Tibetan singing bowls. These “things” honor and symbolize that we’re establishing a sacred space and time — setting a symbolic boundary to distinguish that this will not be a place for the “normal” way we interact with each other, the normal conversations. Instead we are establishing that this will be a time for a deeper form of listening and sharing of our real selves, vulnerable selves, the selves in us that need to be seen and heard in order to grow and become even more our true selves in the world. In this safe space, we can talk about the hard issues — all the isms we experience as individuals in this world and grow our capacities for compassion for each other and ourselves. We deeply inform each other.

 
 
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Through deep connection and intimacy in relationship, we discover who we are. Through listening to others, we create healthy relationships. Through being heard and hearing ourselves, we find our own answers.

Despite our increasingly plugged in, tuned in world, more people than ever are anxious, afraid, sad, feeling disconnected and lonely. Strong relationships to self and others anchors us and gives us peace in the discomfort of uncertainty. We live in uncertain times. Our youth are especially vulnerable to this. We can mentor them and give them a way to live through these times with consciousness, compassion, and true joy. 

 

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This work saves lives.

We know that healthy relationships are key for thriving — social research has verified that completely. Yet how to have them, how to nurture a healthy relationship within ourselves and with others takes practice. It’s a life-long process. What young people practice in circle, they bring into all their relationships — with parents, teachers, peers.

Dubbed "The Antidote to Social Media," Teen Talking Circles offers youth opportunities to be face to face with themselves and each other in real time — to share their truth, be heard fully, and to listen fully to others. In circle, teens co-create the safety to feel, to express who they really are and what they’re really going through, without fear of rejection or judgment.

In circle, teens are reflected and encouraged by their facilitators and peers to hear themselves and come to their own answers, rather than being told how to fix themselves.

Circle gives young people a place to discover that they are not alone, and that whatever they are going through is part of a process of change and growth. Circle is about being seen and welcomed no matter what one is going through — the exciting, exhilarating parts of being a teenager, as well as the troughs of confusion, fear and grief, and all that is in between. It’s about working through relationships, and coming into a more conscious, healthy relationship with oneself and others. It’s about discovering who one really is.

Our TTC model encourages facilitators to bring in guests who can speak on various topics and share their experiences. Through this, we explore subjects and issues in order to create broader, deeper understandings of the root complexities inherent in them. When teens begin to connect the dots — to see how their issues are interconnected with historic social and cultural norms, it is enlightening. From this, they become empowered and inspired to get involved to address social issues and contribute to changing the world for the better. Suddenly, what felt painful or shameful or downright wrong becomes a cause for bold actions.

 





 
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